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Now Available on Steam - Full Throttle Remastered, 20% off!

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Full Throttle Remastered is Now Available on Steam and is 20% off!*

Originally released by LucasArts in 1995, Full Throttle is a classic graphic adventure game from industry legend Tim Schafer, telling the story of Ben Throttle; butt-kicking leader of biker gang the Polecats, who gets caught up in a tale of Motorcycles, Mayhem and Murder. Now over 20 years later, Full Throttle is back in a remastered edition that features all new hand-drawn and 3D high-resolution artwork with 4k support, and with remastered audio and music.

*Offer ends April 25 at 10AM Pacific Time

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ecaldwell
70 days ago
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Take my money.
Washington, District of Columbia
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Sweet 16

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Every year I make out my bracket at the season, and every year it's busted before the first game when I find out which teams are playing.
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popular
83 days ago
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ecaldwell
86 days ago
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Washington, District of Columbia
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4 public comments
emdot
82 days ago
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I've got $100,000 on that Cinderella team.
San Luis Obispo, CA
Covarr
85 days ago
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Much to everyone's surprise, the winner was Average Joe's Gymnasium, blissfully unaware that they weren't playing dodgeball.
Moses Lake, WA
mareino
86 days ago
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There are some definitional issues to work out, but the 88 Lakers are probably good enough to win this.
Washington, District of Columbia
CaffieneKitty
85 days ago
I know nothing about non-hockey sports, so I'll be pulling for the Segways.
alt_text_bot
86 days ago
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Every year I make out my bracket at the season, and every year it's busted before the first game when I find out which teams are playing.
egc52556
86 days ago
Any team with Lebron

Mat Marquis

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Mat Marquis

Who are you, and what do you do?

My name is Mat Marquis, inscrutably nicknamed "Wilto" since high school. I design and build fast, accessible, responsive websites at Bocoup. I do a decent amount of speaking, and I published JavaScript for Web Designers with A Book Apart a couple months back.

Outside of work, I collect hobbies. I'm a born-and-raised New England woodworker. I box better than someone who does not box, but not by very much. I cook, mostly French. I am endlessly repairing my '78 Triumph Bonneville.

What hardware do you use?

I own a lot of tools.

The family policy is "buy the cheapest version of a tool, and if you end up using it until it breaks, buy a good one." I've burned through a lot of loose-handled knives that refused to take a decent edge and bottom-shelf-at-Home-Depot wood planes. Here's some of the stuff I ended up with.

I'm prepared to say that I own more screwdrivers than anybody in the greater Boston area, and I'm easily in the top five for pairs of kinda-rusty pliers. I have a Disston D-8 handsaw that works better than it has any right to for being, y'know, roughly one hundred and fifty years old. I inherited a whole range of old Stanley planes and an indestructible old Occidental Leather framer's belt that doesn't see much use anymore. My tablesaw is a decent little Bosch jobsite saw; I ain't got much room to work with. My bandsaw is an Amazon-dot-com-discount-bin benchtop job that has yet to break down on me, but that clock is tickin' - I had a beastly JET a few years ago, but y'know, I'm an apartment woodworker now, in a tiny garage. I miss my old DeWalt mitre saw, which straight-up broke on me. I got a Rigid now; it kicks a little and the laser sight thing is goofy, but it cuts just fine. Diablo blades in er'rything. My favorite hammer has a skull on it.

I box with Cleto Reyes gloves (red, of course) - which make every other pair of gloves feel like big dumb foam Hulk hands - and a custom Impact mouthguard that has almost definitely saved my oft-punch'd jaw. I'm still in the "use cheap ones until they break" phase with my boxing shoes; Adidas something-or-others? They work fine.

In the kitchen, I have a rattly old KitchenAid stand mixer (red, of course) that I completely took for granted up until I started baking bread in earnest, and now plan to have buried with me someday. I don't exactly have a "knife kit" where I'm never taking my particularly low-production-quality show on the road, but: a Shun Classic 8" chef knife is my go-to, and I have a carbon steel knife I handled myself (padauk, of course) for heavier duty jobs. The blade for the latter was from Hock Tools, who also make damn fine woodworking plane blades. I have a mistreated Shun 5 1/2" Santoku that I picked up for like thirty bucks as a "utility" knife, and a Shun Sora paring knife that I hardly ever use.

I've managed to piece together a pretty respectable collection of pots and pans - mostly All-Clad - and more Lodge cast-irons of various sizes and shapes than anyone could ever realistically need (which, for the record, is "five"). I just got ahold of one of those "lightweight cast-iron" Field skillets and so help me, it might just be my go-to from now on. It doesn't retain heat quite as well as my beastly ol' Lodge, but man, it is so much easier to maneuver.

I.. I recently bought a sous vide gadget. I did. I am deeply, deeply skeptical of it, mostly because I don't like the threat of getting technology all up in my food. I'm really more of a "iron, fire, and action" kinda guy than "aluminum, water, and patience." Still, an hour in a bath and a quick sear over an irresponsibly high flame is having some mean results.

Work-wise, I have a 15-inch MacBook Pro that's getting a little long in the tooth. It does okay; I ain't find much enticing about the new ones anyway. My dark secret is that I use the built-in keyboard and trackpad exclusively; no external mouse or keyboard, even when I'm doing design work. I have no idea why or how this ended up being the case, but here we are.

I recently made a "standing desk" out of some old pallets we had kicking around the office. Not, like, in a Pinterest way. We ain't talking "teal chalk paint and white script-y 'live laugh love' lettering" here - more "actual, literal trash." I'll use it until it breaks, as tradition dictates. My secondary monitor is also hot garbage, speaking of, but it really only ever has full-screen iTerm goin' on it. It's actually kinda nice for quickly checking potential color contrast issues.

And what software?

For code, I use Sublime Text in unspeakably inefficient ways, akin to spinning a pneumatic nailgun around backwards and using it to hammer nails by hand. Canvas is a damn fine writing tool - using it as we speak, in fact - but I still miss Editorially nigh daily.

Design-wise: I'm a little behind the curve, but I officially became Sketch people a few months ago. I'd be ready to ditch the Adobe suite altogether, except for the sake of janky ol' Photoshop's "Save for Web."

I've probably logged more hours in 12 Rounds than any other app on my phone. One of these days, though, I'm gonna use a little of my open source time to cook up a boxing timer of my own; why the hell not, y'know?

What would be your dream setup?

Countertops. Countertops, countertops. When I close my eyes and dare to dream of my perfect home, I see only countertops. End-grain butcher block, soapstone, marble - y'know, I'm not picky. Countertops in every room. LMM and I got like three feet of counter space and a wobbly IKEA table in our apartment kitchen, and it is killing us. I wouldn't balk at a more professional-grade range, either. Maybe a nice freezer chest. Or a walk-in; that'd cover me for both cooking and Rocky-style boxing.

I'm relegated to an unheated two-car garage for all my woodworking and endless motorcycle-tinkering, and that isn't the ideal situation up here in the frozen northeast. Just.. just heat, y'know? I'd like heat. We're not even talking seventy two degrees year-round, here - just, like, warm enough that my wood glue doesn't turn to chalk during everything but our week and a half of Summer. I mean, sure, I wouldn't be mad about having enough space to ditch some of these tiny benchtop tools. But man. Heat.

At work, y'know, I'm doing just fine. "Have laptop, will travel." I am - at least, at work - pretty low-maintenance.


Thanks for reading! If you're enjoying the interviews, you can help keep this nerdy lil' site independent for as little as $1 a month!

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ecaldwell
97 days ago
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"...buy the cheapest version of a tool, and if you end up using it until it breaks, buy a good one."

I love this philosophy.
Washington, District of Columbia
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I Can't Stop Watching This Video Of Infuriating Fuck-Ups

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You know how when you’re scrolling through Facebook, and you happen upon one of those top-down videos that shows a pair of hands creating some sort of delicious food or craft, and then you get stuck watching it for three or four minutes, not because you are especially interested in how to make pineapple upside down…

Read more...

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ecaldwell
98 days ago
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Hilarious.
Washington, District of Columbia
sandge
97 days ago
The family of that egg should be pressing charges. That was brutal.
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Netflix was born out of this grad-school math problem

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Netflix ceo reed hastings

The idea for web-video giant Netflix, which today reaches nearly 100 million people around the world, can be traced back to a math problem co-founder Reed Hastings was instructed to solve back in graduate school.

While studying computer science at Stanford University in the 1980s, Hastings said there was an exercise by computer scientist Andrew Tanenbaum in which he had to work out the bandwidth of a station wagon carrying tapes across the US. “It turns out that’s a very high-speed network,” Hastings said, speaking at a Mobile World Congress session in Barcelona. “From that original exercise, it made me think we can build Netflix first on DVD and then eventually the internet would catch up with the postal system and pass it.”

The concept, of sending electronically information physically, is known as a sneakernet. This is how Tanenbaum and co-writer David Wetherall described the problem in their book Computer Analysis (fifth edition, pdf):

One of the most common ways to transport data from one computer to another is to write them onto magnetic tape or removable media (e.g., recordable DVDs), physically transport the tape or disks to the destination machine, and read them back in again. Although this method is not as sophisticated as using a geosynchronous communication satellite, it is often more cost effective, especially for applications in which high bandwidth or cost per bit transported is the key factor.

A simple calculation will make this point clear. An industry-standard Ultrium tape can hold 800 gigabytes. A box 60 × 60 × 60 cm can hold about 1000 of these tapes, for a total capacity of 800 terabytes, or 6400 terabits (6.4 petabits). A box of tapes can be delivered anywhere in the United States in 24 hours by Federal Express and other companies. The effective bandwidth of this transmission is 6400 terabits/86,400 sec, or a bit over 70 Gbps. If the destination is only an hour away by road, the bandwidth is increased to over 1700 Gbps. No computer network can even approach this. Of course, networks are getting faster, but tape densities are increasing, too.

If we now look at cost, we get a similar picture. The cost of an Ultrium tape is around $40 when bought in bulk. A tape can be reused at least 10 times, so the tape cost is maybe $4000 per box per usage. Add to this another $1000 for shipping (probably much less), and we have a cost of roughly $5000 to ship 800 TB. This amounts to shipping a gigabyte for a little over half a cent. No network can beat that. The moral of the story is:

Never underestimate the bandwidth of a station wagon full of tapes hurtling down the highway.

Hastings had an embarrassingly large late fee in the mid-Nineties and became intrigued by the possibility of video rentals by mail, which would have been too costly with VHS tapes—but now the DVD had arrived and was starting to take off. Hastings thought about how his math problem could be applied to video-rental delivery.

“When a friend told me about DVDs and I realized, well that’s 5GB of data, and you know you can mail that very inexpensively, I realized that is a digital-distribution network,” Hastings said.

He and Netflix co-founder Marc Randolph reportedly went down to Logos, a record store in Santa Cruz, California, and bought a used CD to test it out. They picked up a blue greeting-card envelope from a gift shop on Pacific Avenue and went to the nearest post office, where they mailed the CD to Hastings’s house using a single first-class stamp, Randolph told Silicon Valley Business Journal. The next day, Hastings went to see Randolph with the CD in hand—unbroken.

“That was the moment where the two of us looked at each other and said, ‘This idea just might work,'” Randolph said.

Even in those early days, Hastings and Randolph were already thinking about how the internet could change video. But they knew the shift away from physical rentals wouldn’t happen overnight, and didn’t want to tie themselves to specific mode of a delivery.

“If we were to come out and say, ‘This is all about downloading or streaming,’ and we said that in 1997 and ’98, that would have been equally disastrous,” said Randolph. “We had to come up with a positioning which transcends the medium.” Thus, Netflix branded itself as a place to find movies, and now TV shows, you’ll love, while placing itself at the forefront of digital-video delivery.



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ecaldwell
119 days ago
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Washington, District of Columbia
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Apple vs. Google company structure, as seen through patents

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For Co.Design, Periscopic compared patent ownership between Apple and Google, which ends up providing a good idea of company structure.

“Over the past 10 years Apple has produced 10,975 patents with a team of 5,232 inventors, and Google has produced 12,386 with a team of 8,888,” writes Wes Bernegger, data explorer at Periscopic. Those numbers are, frankly, pretty similar in terms of proportion. “The most notable difference we see is the presence of the group of highly connected, experienced ‘super inventors’ at the core of Apple compared to the more evenly dispersed innovation structure in Google,” he continues. “This seems to indicate a top-down, more centrally controlled system in Apple vs. potentially more independence and empowerment in Google.”

Be sure to check out PatentsView too, where these networks stem from.

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ecaldwell
120 days ago
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Washington, District of Columbia
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